15

May

The Washington Post | The Hunt: The Search for Osama bin Laden (VIDEOS)

osama timeline

The life and death of Osama bin Laden

DOSSIER: Killing Osama bin Laden: The Washington Post’s reporting on the al Qaeda leader’s death

(…)

VIDEO | “The Hunt: The Search for Osama bin Laden

The Phases (Select from the chapters below)

VIDEO EDITING AND SHOOTING: Alexandra Garcia and Ben de la Cruz
WRITING AND REPORTING: Marc Fisher, Ian Shapira and Peter Finn
MOTION GRAPHICS: Sohail Al-Jamea
INTERACTIVE DESIGN: Grace Koerber
PHOTO RESEARCH: Dee Swann
VIDEO SHOOTING AND RESEARCH: AJ Chavar
VIDEO RESEARCH: Akira Hakuta, Jayne Orenstein, Tucker Walsh, Jason Aldag and Jonathan Forsythe
CARTOGRAPHY: Laris Karklis and Gene Thorp
INTERACTIVE PRODUCER: Sam Sanders
EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Steven King and Cory Haik
PHOTO CREDITS: AFP, The Associated Press, Getty Images, Linda Davidson for the Washington Post, The White House

(…)

Cf. What Obama said on ‘60 Minutes’

04

May

The New York Times | Dossier: The Death of Osama Bin Laden News

A list of Web sites about Osama bin Laden as selected by editors of The New York Times.

Documents

Other Coverage

Times Book Reviews

Terrorism Navigator

A list of resources about terrorism as selected by researchers and editors of The New York Times.

Terrorist Incidents

The Global Terrorist Threat

Documents

More Multimedia »

AP Photo

Updated: May 3, 2011 

Osama bin Laden was a son of the Saudi elite whose radical violent campaign to recreate a seventh-century Muslim empire redefined the threat of terrorism for the 21st century.

With the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001, Bin Laden was elevated to the realm of evil in the American imagination once reserved for dictators like Hitler and Stalin. He was a new national enemy, his face on wanted posters, gloating on videotapes, taunting the United States and Western civilization.

He was killed on May 2, 2011, by American military and C.I.A. operatives who tracked him to a compound in Pakistan and shot him during a firefight.

Read More…

Obituary | Osama bin Laden, 1957-2011

The Most Wanted Face of Terrorism
The Most Wanted Face of Terrorism
By KATE ZERNIKE and MICHAEL T. KAUFMAN

With the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Osama bin Laden was elevated to the realm of evil in the American imagination once reserved for dictators like Hitler and Stalin.

Articles

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21

Apr

Fidel y Raúl clausuran VI Congreso del Partido Comunista de Cuba ( Fotos y Video) | Cubadebate

 

Con un emocionado aplauso, los delegados al VI Congreso del Partido Comunista de Cuba recibieron al líder de la Revolución Fidel Castro, acompañado de su hermano Raúl, segundo secretario de la organización y Presidente del país. Foto: Ismael Francisco

08

Apr

As far as we know, no great triumphs or tragedies took place here. But it was a place where people led their lives, where they raised children. And it’s nice to have little fragments reminding you of people who were here before.

That’s homeowner John Woods, who lives in an old house on City Island that held relics of the different people who lived there over time.  With so many old apartments and houses in NYC, residents often stumble upon old treasures, some useful or worth money, others not as much.  I live in a house that’s over 100 years old and years ago we found old newspapers stuffed in our basement ceiling.  I suddenly viewed my house a time machine and belonging to many other people in the past.  It that trite movie-way, I suddenly felt connected to all who slept under it’s roof.  

-KH

[NYT]

(via the20newyork)

06

Apr

Khalifa Haftar: The man who left Virginia to lead Libya’s rebels | CNN


 

His story reads like a political thriller. Once a confidant of Moammar Gadhafi and then his sworn enemy, he led a band of Libyan exiles trying to overthrow the Libyan regime before being spirited in secrecy to the United States when things went bad. His name is Khalifa Haftar.

 

He has lived in Virginia for 20 years but now he’s back in Libya, trying to knock the rebel force into some kind of shape.

CNN has spoken to several people who know Haftar well, and they agree on one thing: His role will be crucial, if the opposition is to mount a serious military challenge to Gadhafi.

For Haftar it’s personal. He has never forgiven Gadhafi for letting him rot as a prisoner of war in neighboring Chad after a disastrous military campaign in the 1980s.

 

 

By all accounts, Haftar is a soldier’s soldier — respected by junior officers, with a good command of battlefield doctrine. Some detect his hand in the better defensive organization of rebel positions around Ajdabiya, a town critical for the defense of Benghazi but also giving access to the south.

Khalifa Haftar: The man who left Virginia to lead Libya’s rebels | CNN

His story reads like a political thriller. Once a confidant of Moammar Gadhafi and then his sworn enemy, he led a band of Libyan exiles trying to overthrow the Libyan regime before being spirited in secrecy to the United States when things went bad. His name is Khalifa Haftar.

He has lived in Virginia for 20 years but now he’s back in Libya, trying to knock the rebel force into some kind of shape.

CNN has spoken to several people who know Haftar well, and they agree on one thing: His role will be crucial, if the opposition is to mount a serious military challenge to Gadhafi.

For Haftar it’s personal. He has never forgiven Gadhafi for letting him rot as a prisoner of war in neighboring Chad after a disastrous military campaign in the 1980s.

By all accounts, Haftar is a soldier’s soldier — respected by junior officers, with a good command of battlefield doctrine. Some detect his hand in the better defensive organization of rebel positions around Ajdabiya, a town critical for the defense of Benghazi but also giving access to the south.

03

Apr

Dirty billions: the US bank and Mexico’s bloody drugs war

02

Apr


Children of the Revolution

In the uprisings across the Arab world, protesters are finding that revolution is sometimes child’s play. AN FP Photo Essay.


In Libya, where nearly 35 percent of the population is under age 18, children have been stepping up to fight the battle for their country’s future. The NGO Save the Children estimates that a million children in Libya —  almost half the country’s total youth population —  are in serious danger as government forces battle rebels in towns and cities across the country. Some children - including mercenaries hired by Qaddafi loyalist — are fighting on the frontlines. Here, a young child stands guard for opposition forces in Benghazi, the capital of the uprising, on March 14.


via newsflick

Children of the Revolution

In the uprisings across the Arab world, protesters are finding that revolution is sometimes child’s play. AN FP Photo Essay.

In Libya, where nearly 35 percent of the population is under age 18, children have been stepping up to fight the battle for their country’s future. The NGO Save the Children estimates that a million children in Libya —  almost half the country’s total youth population —  are in serious danger as government forces battle rebels in towns and cities across the country. Some children - including mercenaries hired by Qaddafi loyalist — are fighting on the frontlines. Here, a young child stands guard for opposition forces in Benghazi, the capital of the uprising, on March 14.

via newsflick

(Source: newsflick)

30

Mar

via SIC Notícias | 30.03.2011

Tudo sobre os preceitos e tradições que envolvem um doutoramento “honoris causa”. Ou: de como Coimbra se prepara para homenagear Lula da Silva, um doutorado com «uma mão bem constituída» e «bastante grande», que obrigou a fazer um anel maior do que é habitual!…

27

Mar

Japão | “As Tsunami Robbed Life, It Also Robs Rite of Death”

In Japan, it is not normal to bury the dead, much less to lay dozens side by side in a backhoe-dug furrow. Cremation is both nearly universal and an important rite in an elaborate funeral tradition deeply rooted in Buddhism.

But across coastal northeast Japan, tradition has collided this month with mathematical reality. The number of dead and missing from the March 11 tsunami has climbed past 22,000, and in the small towns and rural villages where most people died, there are by far too many bodies to burn. READ MORE

Foto: Shiho Fukada