19

Apr

07

Nov

Today, Twitter goes public. 
Follow all the action on our LIVE BLOG. 




Twitter prices its IPO at $26 per share, above estimates.
For more on the Twitter IPO, tune in to CNBC starting with Worldwide Exchange at 5a ET, where CNBC’s Julia Boorstin will have an exclusive sit-down interview with Twitter CEO Dick Costolo.





This is where Twitter will go public tomorrow on the floor of the NYSE. The social media company has hired Barclays Capital as a “designated market maker,” a critical role when a stock first trades. 






What the heck is a cashtag? If you’re thinking about investing in the #TwitterIPO later this week, it’s time to study up. Lucky for you, CNBC’s social media teamed joined forces with technology editor Cadie Thompson to put together this Twitter 101 video series. 





Twitter executives are making the rounds on Wall Street today as the roadshow kicks off ahead of its IPO. 
Seen here, a scrolling message outside Morgan Stanley, welcoming @Twitter. 




No more secrets: Twitter IPO filing is now public. http://cnb.cx/19ocyCk 







Twitter has filed confidentially with the SEC for an IPO. Latest info: http://cnb.cx/15YifGp

Today, Twitter goes public. 

Follow all the action on our LIVE BLOG

Twitter prices its IPO at $26 per share, above estimates.
For more on the Twitter IPO, tune in to CNBC starting with Worldwide Exchange at 5a ET, where CNBC’s Julia Boorstin will have an exclusive sit-down interview with Twitter CEO Dick Costolo.

Twitter prices its IPO at $26 per share, above estimates.

For more on the Twitter IPO, tune in to CNBC starting with Worldwide Exchange at 5a ET, where CNBC’s Julia Boorstin will have an exclusive sit-down interview with Twitter CEO Dick Costolo.

This is where Twitter will go public tomorrow on the floor of the NYSE. The social media company has hired Barclays Capital as a “designated market maker,” a critical role when a stock first trades. 

This is where Twitter will go public tomorrow on the floor of the NYSE. The social media company has hired Barclays Capital as a “designated market maker,” a critical role when a stock first trades.

What the heck is a cashtag? If you’re thinking about investing in the #TwitterIPO later this week, it’s time to study up. Lucky for you, CNBC’s social media teamed joined forces with technology editor Cadie Thompson to put together this Twitter 101 video series. 

What the heck is a cashtag? If you’re thinking about investing in the #TwitterIPO later this week, it’s time to study up. Lucky for you, CNBC’s social media teamed joined forces with technology editor Cadie Thompson to put together this Twitter 101 video series.

Twitter executives are making the rounds on Wall Street today as the roadshow kicks off ahead of its IPO. 
Seen here, a scrolling message outside Morgan Stanley, welcoming @Twitter. 

Twitter executives are making the rounds on Wall Street today as the roadshow kicks off ahead of its IPO

Seen here, a scrolling message outside Morgan Stanley, welcoming @Twitter.

No more secrets: Twitter IPO filing is now public. http://cnb.cx/19ocyCk 

No more secrets: Twitter IPO filing is now public. http://cnb.cx/19ocyCk 

Twitter has filed confidentially with the SEC for an IPO. Latest info: http://cnb.cx/15YifGp

Twitter has filed confidentially with the SEC for an IPO. Latest info: http://cnb.cx/15YifGp

cnbc:

Today, Twitter goes public. 
Follow all the action on our LIVE BLOG. 

cnbc:

Today, Twitter goes public. 

Follow all the action on our LIVE BLOG

12

Oct

Fashion has been given a new definition in Bhutan by a Facebook page called “Bhutan Street Fashion” acronym as BSF. From sketches to modeling, all activities were performed, shared and the number of followers got manifold in no time. People from all walks of life started watching and commenting. It gave an inspiration to every common man out there to mould himself a little and get fashionable.

This page has been featured in one of the tabs of our fb page as follows:



Active participation by the fans made this page a huge success and eventually people started taking it to the next level.
Fans from various other countries have taken quite interesting photographs and mailing them to BSF which later get posted on the page.  An album showcasing the same is maintained as: “Fan Mails & Pics”
# BSF:   Facebook   Twitter   GooglePlus   Youtube
-TOB
Cf.:
http://talesofbhutan.wordpress.com/2011/09/18/bhutan-street-fashion-featured-fb-page/http://www.kuenselonline.com/2011/?p=696http://www.businessbhutan.bt/?p=6891
http://lharikhamba.blogspot.com/2011/07/sketch.html

Fashion has been given a new definition in Bhutan by a Facebook page called “Bhutan Street Fashion” acronym as BSF. From sketches to modeling, all activities were performed, shared and the number of followers got manifold in no time. People from all walks of life started watching and commenting. It gave an inspiration to every common man out there to mould himself a little and get fashionable.

This page has been featured in one of the tabs of our fb page as follows:

bsf

Active participation by the fans made this page a huge success and eventually people started taking it to the next level.

Fans from various other countries have taken quite interesting photographs and mailing them to BSF which later get posted on the page.  An album showcasing the same is maintained as: “Fan Mails & Pics”

# BSF:   Facebook   Twitter   GooglePlus   Youtube

-TOB

Cf.:

http://talesofbhutan.wordpress.com/2011/09/18/bhutan-street-fashion-featured-fb-page/
http://www.kuenselonline.com/2011/?p=696
http://www.businessbhutan.bt/?p=6891

http://lharikhamba.blogspot.com/2011/07/sketch.html

22

Sep

NYTimes | Social Networking in the 1600s

image

Men enjoying a drink and a chat in a 17th-century coffeehouse.


By TOM STANDAGE
Published: June 22, 2013

LONDON — SOCIAL networks stand accused of being enemies of productivity. According to one popular (if questionable) infographic circulating online, the use of Facebook, Twitter and other such sites at work costs the American economy $650 billion each year. Our attention spans are atrophying, our test scores declining, all because of these “weapons of mass distraction.”

Yet such worries have arisen before. In England in the late 1600s, very similar concerns were expressed about another new media-sharing environment, the allure of which seemed to be undermining young people’s ability to concentrate on their studies or their work: the coffeehouse. It was the social-networking site of its day.

Like coffee itself, coffeehouses were an import from the Arab world. England’s first coffeehouse opened in Oxford in the early 1650s, and hundreds of similar establishments sprang up in London and other cities in the following years. People went to coffeehouses not just to drink coffee, but to read and discuss the latest pamphlets and news-sheets and to catch up on rumor and gossip.

Coffeehouses were also used as post offices. Patrons would visit their favorite coffeehouses several times a day to check for new mail, catch up on the news and talk to other coffee drinkers, both friends and strangers. Some coffeehouses specialized in discussion of particular topics, like science, politics, literature or shipping. As customers moved from one to the other, information circulated with them.

The diary of Samuel Pepys, a government official, is punctuated by variations of the phrase “thence to the coffeehouse.” His entries give a sense of the wide-ranging conversations he found there. The ones for November 1663 alone include references to “a long and most passionate discourse between two doctors,” discussions of Roman history, how to store beer, a new type of nautical weapon and an approaching legal trial.

One reason these conversations were so lively was that social distinctions were not recognized within the coffeehouse walls. Patrons were not merely permitted but encouraged to strike up conversations with strangers from entirely different walks of life. As the poet Samuel Butler put it, “gentleman, mechanic, lord, and scoundrel mix, and are all of a piece.”

Not everyone approved. As well as complaining that Christians had abandoned their traditional beer in favor of a foreign drink, critics worried that coffeehouses were keeping people from productive work. Among the first to sound the alarm, in 1677, was Anthony Wood, an Oxford academic. “Why doth solid and serious learning decline, and few or none follow it now in the University?” he asked. “Answer: Because of Coffea Houses, where they spend all their time.”

Meanwhile, Roger North, a lawyer, bemoaned, in Cambridge, the “vast Loss of Time grown out of a pure Novelty. For who can apply close to a Subject with his Head full of the Din of a Coffee-house?” These places were “the ruin of many serious and hopeful young gentlemen and tradesmen,” according to a pamphlet, “The Grand Concern of England Explained,” published in 1673.

All of which brings to mind the dire warnings issued by many modern commentators. A common cause for concern, both then and now, is that new media-sharing platforms pose a particular danger to the young.

But what was the actual impact of coffeehouses on productivity, education and innovation? Rather than enemies of industry, coffeehouses were in fact crucibles of creativity, because of the way in which they facilitated the mixing of both people and ideas. Members of the Royal Society, England’s pioneering scientific society, frequently retired to coffeehouses to extend their discussions. Scientists often conducted experiments and gave lectures in coffeehouses, and because admission cost just a penny (the price of a single cup), coffeehouses were sometimes referred to as “penny universities.” It was a coffeehouse argument among several fellow scientists that spurred Isaac Newton to write his “Principia Mathematica,” one of the foundational works of modern science.

Coffeehouses were platforms for innovation in the world of business, too. Merchants used coffeehouses as meeting rooms, which gave rise to new companies and new business models. A London coffeehouse called Jonathan’s, where merchants kept particular tables at which they would transact their business, turned into the London Stock Exchange. Edward Lloyd’s coffeehouse, a popular meeting place for ship captains, shipowners and traders, became the famous insurance market Lloyd’s.

And the economist Adam Smith wrote much of his masterpiece “The Wealth of Nations” in the British Coffee House, a popular meeting place for Scottish intellectuals, among whom he circulated early drafts of his book for discussion.

No doubt there was some time-wasting going on in coffeehouses. But their merits far outweighed their drawbacks. They provided a lively social and intellectual environment, which gave rise to a stream of innovations that shaped the modern world. It is no coincidence that coffee remains the traditional drink of collaboration and networking today.

Now the spirit of the coffeehouse has been reborn in our social-media platforms. They, too, are open to all comers, and allow people from different walks of life to meet, debate, and share information with friends and strangers alike, forging new connections and sparking new ideas. Such conversations may be entirely virtual, but they have enormous potential to bring about change in the real world.

Although some bosses deride the use of social media in the workplace as “social notworking,” more farsighted companies are embracing “enterprise social networks,” essentially corporate versions of Facebook, to encourage collaboration, discover hidden talents and knowledge among their employees, and reduce the use of e-mail. A study published in 2012 by McKinsey & Company, the consulting firm, found that the use of social networking within companies increased the productivity of “knowledge workers” by 20 to 25 percent.

The use of social media in education, meanwhile, is backed by studies showing that students learn more effectively when they interact with other learners. OpenWorm, a pioneering computational biology project started from a single tweet, now involves collaborators around the world who meet via Google Hangouts. Who knows what other innovations are brewing in the Internet’s global coffeehouse?

There is always an adjustment period when new technologies appear. During this transitional phase, which can take several years, technologies are often criticized for disrupting existing ways of doing things. But the lesson of the coffeehouse is that modern fears about the dangers of social networking are overdone. This kind of media, in fact, has a long history: Martin Luther’s use of pamphlets in the Reformation casts new light on the role of social media in the Arab Spring, for example, and there are parallels between the gossipy poems that circulated in pre-Revolutionary France and the uses of microblogging in modern China.

As we grapple with the issues raised by new technologies, there is much we can learn from the past.

* Tom Standage is the digital editor at The Economist and the author of the forthcoming book “Writing on the Wall: Social Media — The First 2,000 Years.”

18

Sep

Twitter Infographics

"We’ve confidentially submitted an S-1 to the SEC for a planned IPO. "

Twitter’s announcement is already ‘taking over’ the Internet.

And here are +250 #infographics, posters, illustrations and more, on #Pinterest: http://ow.ly/oPhEq

07

Sep

Facebook’s Global Government Requests [Interactive]

07

May

newsweek:

Michael Moynihan spends a week in the online terror underworld—most of which happens on Facebook—for our cover story: http://www.jihad.com. 

newsweek:

Michael Moynihan spends a week in the online terror underworld—most of which happens on Facebook—for our cover story: http://www.jihad.com

16

Jan

How Facebook affects your memory 
Researchers believe the similarity of online communication to everyday speech makes it more memorable than lines from books.

How Facebook affects your memory

Researchers believe the similarity of online communication to everyday speech makes it more memorable than lines from books.

08

Jan

16 Twitter Stars To Add To Your Feed Now

Fast Company editors put their heads together and compiled some of our favorite feeds. Here’s who to follow in 2013 if you want to:

If you’re looking for a place to get involved, New York Times journalist Nicholas Kristof has plenty of ideas for you. Engaging his audience with empathy, the globe-trotting advocate for justice compels readers to get involved with dire—and worthy—causes.

Jittery genius Box CEO Aaron Levie’s Twitter feed is one of the most entertaining things to read on the Internet. “Every time someone says your idea won’t work, just remember they also said that to the guy who came up with the typewriter,” he tweeted earlier this month. Take that, haters!

The fictional Fathom Butterfly, created by author Josh Gosfield, is a notorious beauty queen, showgirl, porn star, felon, and feminist filmmaker who is constantly proving that Twitter is an excellent storytelling medium.

Gretchen Rubin, author of the The Happiness Project, puts out a steady drumbeat of optimism and useful tips for becoming a happier version of yourself.

The key to satisfaction in your career and in your life is learning how to spend—your money, your time, your energy—most effectively. Work-life balance guru Laura Vanderkam helps you figure that out.

Filmmaker and Webby Awards founder Tiffany Shlain is quirky, inspirational, and full of interesting facts.

Pierre Omidyar of Omidyar Network, a philanthropic investment firm, retweets links on what he calls the “peer news/civil beat.”

Former Middle East reporter Lara Setrakian is a go-to source for information coming out of Syria. She’s also disrupting the news industry with her startup, Syria Deeply.

Thrive Labs’ self-proclaimed “visioner” Priya Parker’s Twitter feed is a stream of deep innovation inspiration.

Responsible in large part for the Second Coming of Digg, the social bookmarking site’s 27-year-old editorial director David Weiner’s Twitter account is a one-man news feed chronicling the day’s big events, punctuated regularly with his comedic one-liners.

If you want to be close to the media, you need to understand the media. CNN producer Jason Samuels' Twitter feed is like a daily crash course on the state of the industry.

The Wall Street Journal programmer Jeremy Singer-Vine’s Twitter feed is littered with links to geeky ephemera.

Startup advisor, entrepreneur, tech journalist, and founder of PitchTo Wayne Sutton aims to “help investors make smarter decisions and entrepreneurs make exceptional pitches.”

New Yorker staff writer David Grann offers thoughtful curation and commentary on domestic news.

Weeds actor Romany Malco poses thoughtful questions and compelling insights. Sometimes wickedly funny, he reserves most of his humor for @tijuanajackson.

Penguin publicity manager and Publishing Genius author Melissa Broder’s alter ego lives on Twitter, where each beautiful, neurotic, self-effacing line accumulates in a never-ending poem. Go here when you need to shake your brain up.